Original Research

An investigation into the English reading comprehension of Grade 10 English first additional language learners at a senior secondary school

Chaka Chaka, Nada N. Booi-Ncetani
Reading & Writing | Vol 6, No 1 | a62 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/rw.v6i1.62 | © 2015 Chaka Chaka, Nada N. Booi-Ncetani | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 28 September 2014 | Published: 22 May 2015

About the author(s)

Chaka Chaka, Department of Applied Languages, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa, South Africa
Nada N. Booi-Ncetani, Department of Applied Languages, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Poor levels of English first additional language (EFAL) reading comprehension amongst school learners at most public schools in South Africa are a great concern. In fact, for learning to be successful and effective, learners need to be able to read well in EFAL. This is more so as EFAL serves as a language of learning and teaching (LOLT) for most learning areas in South Africa’s public schools. Against this background, this study set out in 2012 to investigate the English reading comprehension of Grade 10 EFAL learners at a senior secondary school. Using purposive and voluntary sampling techniques, the study had 17 EFAL learners(M = 10, F–7) as its participants. It employed three reading measures, a recall task, a summary and a comprehension test, which were based on three English extracts, to assess participants’ reading comprehension. It then assessed and scored participants’ responses to the three tasks by using an oral reading rubric and two prepared marking memoranda. One of the findings of this study was that, of the three reading tasks administered, participants did slightly above average in the comprehension test, but performed below average in the two other tasks – the recall and summary tasks.

Keywords

No related keywords in the metadata.

Metrics

Total abstract views: 4155
Total article views: 10268


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.